Monday, March 19, 2007

Quoting: What are the rules?

I'm still working on my long series project, and I spent a little time this weekend reading Italian poetry (in English) with hopes of finding lines that I could weave (in Italian) into some of the poems. My attempt to be multilingual and literary (with appropriate references in notes).

I was slowly making my way through Il Purgatorio and also reading some twentieth century poets. Then, late Saturday afternoon, I remembered something that I'd heard about using quotes—for example, in epigraphs: You have to get permission, unless the poet is dead.

Is that true? Does anyone know?

3 comments:

aka Leonardo Likes Gulls said...

Hi Joanie,

I stumbled upon your blog.

This is a good question I'd also be interested in because in my next mss, I use an epigraph from a living poet.

If I find out anything, I'll let you know.

Best,
Kelli (R. A.)

aka Leonardo Likes Gulls said...

Hi Joanie,

I stumbled upon your blog.

This is a good question I'd also be interested in because in my next mss, I use an epigraph from a living poet.

If I find out anything, I'll let you know.

Best,
Kelli (R. A.)

Joannie said...

Not a lot of information yet. I spoke with the always-very-helpful folks at Open Books: A Poem Emporium in Seattle, and the answer was that dead might not be dead enough. To be on the safe side, you need to quote someone who has been dead a long time. However, I have some other people I can ask. I just have to get over my current bout of shyness and send the mail. Stay tuned...